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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
(narrator) henry moore was the world's foremost sculptor for 40 years. his creative legacy in many ways exemplifies the cultural ambitions of his time. he was every bit as surprising and complex as his art, a miner's son who refused a knighthood, a sculptor who caught the public's interest with his drawings, d ryt with a common touch. (henry moore) recently, there was a book published on my work by some jungian psychologist, a very good writer named nauman. i think the title was the archetypal world of henry moore and he sent me a copy, which he asked me to read. but after the first chapter i thought i better stop because it explained too much. and i thought it might stop me from ticking over if i went on and knew it all. (narrator) moore was english to the bone, he carved his reputation in english elm and boxwood, cumberland alabaster, and portland stone. when his art made him wealthy he turned to bronze and marble, but he never turned away from england. for all its rain and taxes it w h and he cleared a new path for english art. (anthony caro) you look at the history of english a
. >> reporter: good morning, george. five out of nine days of this trial dee dee moore has broken down in court. where her emotions ran so high, she had to be reprimanded by the judge. and thursday, of course, no different. dee dee moore's latest emotional outburst was so severe, the judge temporarily stopped the trial so she could pull herself together. >> ms. moore, i'm going to tell you once again, you need to compose yourself. >> reporter: the breakdown came after the girlfriend of abraham shakespeare, the man moore is accused of murdering, took the stand. >> he ran out of the bank. and he wasn't coming back. she wanted me to be so mad with him. >> reporter: victoria butler described moore as divisive and manipulative. and went on to say that shakespeare, who won $30 million in the florida lottery in 2006, had given away most of his winnings for people who simply asked for it. prosecutors say moore stole what he had left and then killed him. >> you want another moment to talk to your lawyer? >> yes. >> then, take that moment. >> reporter: moore's reaction to butler's testimony was so severe
testimony about how dee dee moore swindled the lottery winner before murdering him. linsey davis has the details. >> reporter: it's like something out of "csi," george. dee dee moore try wrote a letter she killed. the man who supposedly wrote this letter was not just dead. he was also illiterate. for the first time, when the jury walks into trial for the dee dee moore murder trial, they'll have an escort. this after they said that one of the witnesses and several of the friends and family of the murder victim were staring at them and made them feel uncomfortable when outside the courtroom. >> does it affect your ability to be fair and impartial in this case? >> no. i just want to feel safe. >> reporter: on monday, they looked at rambling two-page letter, that police detective smith said that moore forged in an effort to convince his mother he was still alive. >> she had a brand-new laptop set up, and a printer. she had a rubber type glove on. and a scarf thing over her head. >> what did that conceal? >> that was supposed to conceal her hair. >> reporter: greg smith testified he was i
. >> gretchen: we have a hypochrissy alert. remember michael moor's latest ovie bashing tax rate breaks. >> steve: and a big secret and writing a letter to his younger self as a warning for others not to do the same thing. coach k will reveal that letter with brian next on "fox and friends" ♪ ♪ than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. advil pm®. the difference is a better night's sleep. with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. you can't argue with nutrition you can see. great grains. great grains cereal starts whole and stays whole. see the seam? more pcessed flakes look nothing like natural grains. i'm eating what i kn is better nutrition. mmmm. great grains. search great grains and see for yourself. >> brian: coach k. mike is one of the best co
. with millions of americans unemployed this simply makes no sense. stephen moore, senior writer for "the wall street journal." how are you doing, steve? good morning. >> hi, bill. bill: they're saying 43,000 jobs because of this. what, a latex glove gets taxed? i thought it was just like on mri machines and big items like that? >> actually, no. thank you for doing this segment because a lot of americans don't realize when the president calls for all the new taxes in the fiscal cliff negotiation, mr. president we already have a big tax increase that will hit on january 2nd. that of course is the obamacare taxes. you mentioned one of them, the tax on medical devices and medical equipment, bill, which i agree with, congressman price. that will reduce innovation and will reduce the kind of invention and new products we need to keep people healthier. in addition to that, bill, don't forget there is something called 3.8% investment tax surcharge in the obamacare bill that starts in january. one of the things that the president says is a little misleading i will only raise tax rates back where they
moore. lori moore is the author of three story collections and three novels. the most recent being a aid of the stairs, finalist for the pen faulkner award and the orange prize. for fiction and nonfiction have appeared in "the new yorker," the new york review books, "the new york times," the paris review, the yale review and elsewhere. she's been the recipient that the irish times prize for international fiction, the rea award for a short story, the pen malamud award, the o'henry award and the land and fellowship. she is a member of the american academy of arts and letters and it gives me great pressure to introduce lori moore. [applause] ♪ >> the other members of this year's jury for the national book award in fiction are stacy dur as moe, didn't i'll and janet perry. [applause] why would these otherwise sane, reasonable and brilliant people consent to this juror cracks one where you make a thousand enemies and maybe only one friend? while your front porch fills up of packages and your neighbors think you have a terrible late-night on line shopping habit through the entire spring and
, the jacksonville jaguars will scoop him up next year. >>> ashton kutcher filed divorce papers, but demi moore is holding off on signing them. tmz says moore is ready to get divorced, but holding out for a big divorce settlement. the "two and a half men" co-star has had a successful career and made a fortune investing in technology companies. kutcher cited irreconcilable differences when he filed for divorce from moore. >>> think beautiful people have no problems? listen to this. a woman was fired for being "irresistible." now she's talking. melissa nelson was fired because her boss and his wife felt she was a threat to their marriage. she was a dental assistant. the iowa supreme court ruled that it was legal. she spoke to don lemon yesterday. >> i don't think it's fair. i don't think it's right. the last couple of days have just been an emotional roller coaster. i'm trying to stay strong. >> i don't even know what to say about that, alina. >> the back story, apparently they were exchanging text messages outside of work, the wife got wind of the in late 2009. and in early 2010, she was fired.
ranks led to the push for moore rigorous standards. nationwide only 35% of 8th graders met expectations in reading. and only 25% of high school graduates who took the a.c.t. college entrance exam testedded ready for college. the university of chicago's tim nolls says the poor outcome led to the call for new standards. >> one of the main motivations is looking at the highest performing countries in the world and the most improving countries in the world and saying, what are they doing? one of the things that we find that they're doing is they're teaching many fewer standards. in singapore, for example, which has some of the best mathematics and science results in the world they teach literally half the standards that america attempts to teach. >> reporter: the common core standards were developed by teachers, school administrators, experts and parents. but the developers say the federal government did not have a role in creating the standards. instead they were state-driven. each state must approve the standards if they are to be used. >> we're just going to read very, very short chapter
for the 15- year-old. she walk away from her home in the glenn moore neighborhood yesterday. she is 5'4'', 170 pounds, with brown hair and green eyes, she may be headed to modesto or richmond. >>> the family of a man who died after the giants world series celebrations offering a reward for any information about his death. shaun moffet suffered a head injury. he may have accidentally gotten hurt while jumping on a mattress but his roommates said moffet told him five men attacked him. he died a few days later. police are investigating his death as suspicious. >> now that the court has agreed to take up the issue of same sex marriage we are getting an idea of the possible outcomes. the court could limit its decision to california or say that denying gays the right to marry violates the constitution which would affect all states. the lieutenant governor who conducted same sex weddings in san francisco in 2004 thinks anthony kennedy could decide the issue. >> he has been the key player on advancing the rights of folk whose rights were taken away by public vote. >> many believe it'll be
for business and he is he is isly during a fragile economic recovery. economist steve moore will be joining us in just a moment. heather: plus one side already claiming victory in egypt's controversial new constitution fight. the latest news coming out of cairo. that is coming up. to the best vacation spot on earth. (all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabam louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana seafood is delicious. we're having such a great year on the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. now is the perfect time to visit anyone of our states. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride, go fishing or just lay in the sun. we've got coastline to explore and wildlife to photograph. and there's world class dining with our world famous seafood. so for a great vacation this year, come to the gulf. its all fabulous but i give florida the edge. right after mis
sustain the one-two punch is anybody's question. patti ann: joining us now is steve moore from the "wall street journal." hopefully he can give us some answers. good morning, steve. what is the most immediate impact in we go over the cliff? >> we are talking about january 2nd taxing rising on over a hundred million americans. this is a big sock to the wallet of americans of every income group. let's just talk about the middle class for a minute. for those earning about 45 to 75,000 a year they are looking at paying somewhere in the neighborhood of $2,500 a year more in taxes. it's not just the warn buffets and bill gates that will be hit by tax increases. the other part of the cliff that we don't talk that much about is the automatic spending cuts would take effect starting on january 2nd, an 8% reduction in major spending categories, national defense, many of what we call the domestic discretionary programs would also be hit. this is a big fiscal wallop to the economy and a lot of economists believe it could cause a double-dip recession. patti ann: on the other hand we are hearing from
. >> thank you very much. miss moore recognized for five minutes. >> thank you so much, mr. chairman. i just want to pursue the line of questioning mr. neugebauer venter into because it seems to me that you are suggesting that futures are transparent, they're well-regulated and we all know that swaps were not. and now that this new swaps future market is developing, i'm wondering if you are concerned about the regulatory arbitrage of the, only about 50% of margin being required? they're being treated as equivalence, don't you think, don't you think, margin may be just one of the regulatory gaps that exist. wondering what your thoughts are on that? >> one of the innovations in the market in the last few months has been this product, future on a swap. so it's a future, that trades on a futures exchange and it's cleared and its's transparent. but yes, we're taking a look at it to better understand it. it's a new product. if i can call you chairman as well. the chairman said, we're, the market should innovate that we're not deciding future swaps or futures on swaps but we're certainly taking a l
to the aflac trivia question, julianne moore. that makes sense. the winner katherine savage from san antonio, texas. congratulations. meanwhile, we've become used to the media frenzy surrounding high profile celebrity court cases like casey anthony and o. j. simpson, case where is people follow every move the lawyers make and every word the witnesses say. what about average americans who aren't celebrities, who are facing justice by a jury of their peers? what are those cases really like? our next guest made it his mission to find out. he's spending a year in a small courtroom in new england, joining us, the best selling author of "fatal vision" and other books, joe gothic. >> good morning. >> steve: so 15 gothic street is the street address of the superior court courtroom in massachusetts. >> north hampton. >> steve: so what you decided to do is you were going to spend a year there just watching the everyday stuff that doesn't get the headlines. >> exactly. and write a book in serial form. this is the new approach i'm taking because the old publishing model just doesn't work anymore. and th
time is up spent i thank the gentleman from new york. and 42 minutes. ms. moore is recognized for two minutes. >> thank you so much, chairman garrett and ranking member waters. i just want to lobby the sec nctc for the extraordinary work that both agencies have done to this point. it's a herculean task when you consider a point that ranking member waters has driven into the ground, and that is that you're not adequately funded to do the work that we've asked you to do on such a short timeframe. i am concerned about a couple things today that have already been mentioned, and i look forward to hearing from the regulators, the rulemaking process, particularly on h.r. 4235, which is to build and i authored, which removes the requirement that they be indemnified prior to sharing the data with other regulars, including foreign regulars. that sec has testified to the committee that it favors removal of indian education requirements to the sec commissioners have opined on this, and yet the cftc interim guidance on and unification is something that is not being, it raises grave concern among o
of state, condoleezza rice, and darla moore, south carolina businesswoman. >> i haven't thought yet about where i'll play but i have thought a lot about where i've been. >> when quarterback peyton manning and the indianapolis colts decided to part ways after 14 seasons the coverage of where manning would land was intense. broncos fans learned he would play in denver and must have felt like they won the lottery which made the trade of tim tebow to the new york jets easier to accept. >> golf's newest stars took center stage in 2012. bubba watson introduced himself by winning the masters. it was a humble demeanor and viral video that quickly endeared him to millions. meanwhile, a 23-year-old from northern ireland, rory mcelroy, ended the year as the world's top ranked player. let the comparisons to tiger woods begin. ever since he appeared on the cover of "sports illustrated" as a 17-year-old it wasn't a question of if but when lebron james would achieve true greatness. that came this year when he soared to his first championship with the miami heat, was voted the nba's mvp, and won olympic
. (henry moore) recently, there was a book published on my work by some jungian psychologist, a very good writer named nauman. i think the title was the archetypal world of henry moore and he sent me a copy, which he asked me to read. but after the first chapter i thought i better stop because it explained too much. and i thought it might stop me from ticking over if i went on and knew it all. (narrator) moore was english to the bone, he carved his reputation in english elm and boxwood, cumberland alabaster, and portland stone. when his art made him wealthy he turned to bronze and marble, but he never turned away from england. for all its rain and taxes it was h and he cleared a new path for english art. (anthony caro) you look at the history of english art, and it's pretty miserable after constable and turner and so on, and henry, somehow, was competing with braque and picasso and so on. you know, he was in that same league. and so it made people realize you can be an artist - and you can be english. (narrator) sculpture made him famous, his celebrity enshrined in wax at madame tussaud's
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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